BRIEF HISTORY OF THE YIP LEGISLATION

1976

  • Minnesota’s State Legislature approves passage of the Youth Intervention Program (YIP).  It establishes as a State fiscal priority the support of youth intervention programs to keep youth out of the juvenile justice system. The legislation requires the grantees to come up with $2 in community funding for every $1 provided by the State up to a maximum of $50,000 per grantee.

1978 

  • Twenty-five organizations initially receive State YIP funding.  Total funding program level is $250,000 per year and each program receives $10,000 in State funding.

1978 - 1986   

  • The State’s funding of the Youth Intervention Program (YIP) is decreased by legislative action from $250,000 per year to $150,000 per year.  The programs supported with YIP funding are reduced from 25 to 23 programs and the amount of funding each grantee receives is reduced to $6,500.

1987 

  • YIPA begins advocating for an increase in YIP funding and the first increase in funding for the grantees occurs since the inception of the program.

1989

  • From 1989 to 2001, YIP funding increases from $350,000 to $1,750,000 per year.
  • Number of grantees increases to 52.

2002  

  • Governor Ventura attempts to eliminate the YIP from State funding but YIPA advocacy efforts thwart this effort.

2003  

  • State experiences a $4.2 billion deficit and almost all state sponsored youth funding is eliminated. State’s Youth Intervention Program is kept alive with a 27% reduction.

2005  

  • A 12.5% increase in the base funding of the YIP is achieved.  YIPA lobbies Governor Pawlenty to move the YIP from the MN Department of Jobs and Economic Development (DEED) to the Department of Public Safety where YIPA believes it fits better with their mission. Governor Pawlenty agrees and the program is transfered to the Office of Justice Programs (OJP) within Public Safety.

2006

  • An increase of 13.75% in the base funding of the Youth Intervention Program is achieved, bringing the total funding up to $1,652,000.  This funding adds three more programs and helps existing programs meet unmet intervention needs in the communities they serve.

2007

  • There is a $1,500,000 or 45% increase in funding for Youth Intervention Programs for the 2008-2009 biennium.  This additional money funds 13 new youth intervention programs and provides additional funding to the 54 current programs to address unmet intervention needs in their communities.  Although the bill brought forth by YIPA sought for the new funding to be added to the base, the Governor is concerned about the "tails" and future costs to the State so makes the appropriation one-time funding (not added to the base).

2009

  • With almost a $7 billion deficit, the Minnesota State Legislature and Governor faced an uphill battle to balance the 2010-2011 State budget as required.  The $1.5 million one-time increase in funding that had been acquired in 2007 was lost for the next biennium; however, YIPA successfully convinces the legislature to only cut the base funding by 3%.  The Office of Justice Programs, using Federal dollars, is able to get approximately $800,000 of the potential losses back over the next 2 years so that the total amount lost becomes approximately $800,000 over two years.  In early December 2009, 63 of the 66 currently funded organizations reapplied for the Youth Intervention Program funding.  Of those that applied 57 were awarded new grants and those organizations that were awarded grants will receive a 1.4% reduction in their funding.

2010

  • YIPA continues it's advocacy to keep the Youth Intervention Program funding intact at $1.6 million per year. The Legislature must make cuts to many programs in order to balance the budget as the State is experiencing another deficit. YIP funding is maintained and the grantees receive the same level of funding through the end of the 2010 - 2011 biennium.

2011

  • The State has another budget deficit, this time over $6 billion. YIPA sponsors a bill seeking the same level of funding for the 2012- 2013 biennium knowing that the now Republican controlled Legislature is seeking a "cuts only" approach to balance the budget. The bill also seeks some statute changes but is rejected by the Senate. YIPA is successful in getting language put into the Omnibus Public Safety Bill that protects the funding from being reduced. The bill is vetoed by Governor Dayton because the proposed cuts were too large. The Legislature and Governor can't find a compromise in fixing the budget deficit which results in a three week government shutdown beginning on July 1. A special session ensues but the Capitol doors are locked and YIPA is unable to monitor or provide input on the new Public Safety bill. The language to protect the YIP funding is then left out of the new bill that is signed by the Governor. The new bill gives more money to Public Safety and the Office of Justice Programs (OJP) but there is still a funding reduction compared to the last biennium. The bill language allows Public Safety Commissioner, Mona Dohman, to make the decision on where to reduce spending. The Commissioner decides for a 4% accross the board funding reduction for all programs within the OJP, which includes the YIP. YIPA advocates with OJP to abide by the original bill language. The 4% reduction is set in stone but OJP provides the YIP with an additional $218,000 per year to help reduce the cuts to youth intervention services. 

2013

  • YIPA sponsored a bill that asked for a $7 million biennial increase to the base funding for the Youth Intervention Program. The bill also asked for some policy changes that included YIPA receiving 5% of the YIP funding so that it could begin providing training to the YIP grantees at no cost to them. This approach takes the cost out of the grantees having to pay for their staff to obtain best in class professional development training. At the end of the session and through lots of grass roots advocacy by the YIPA membership, the Youth Intervention Program ended up being awarded a $2 million increase for the 2014 - 2015 biennium. The policy language was also adopted. The result is that 25 new programs will begin receiving Youth Intervention Program funding beginning in 2014. The new total of YIP programs in 2014 will be 75. YIPA's goal is to eventually have 135 programs funded throughout the State so the addition of the new grantees brings us closer to that goal. In addition, 11 of the current grantees also received an increase in funding to address unmet youth intervention needs in their community. The end result: Many more youth will have access to youth intervention services right at the time they need it AND Youth Intervention service providers can now receive the training they need at no cost to them.

 

      

 

 


 

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Related Links

Youth Intervention Programs Association (YIPA)
800 Havenview Court
Mendota Heights, MN 55120
Tel. (651) 452-3589
Fax. (651) 405-8083
info@mnyipa.org

Contact YIPA Staff